Evaporated

longform:

On the trail of two freelance journalists who were kidnapped in Syria in 2012.

thepoliticalnotebook:

If any of you are interested — some of my Columbia classmates are interviewing jazz composer Maria Schneider today at 10AM EST on BlogTalkRadio. 

Maria Schneider is a multiple Grammy-winning Jazz composer. Schneider’s work defies genres. Her most recent album Winter Morning Walks incorporates the work of poet Ted Kooser, in a collaboration with soprano Dawn Upshaw. She talks to Arts and Culture Beat’s Danica Dow and Chris Ip about her work, her inspirations and her views on copyright.

You’re more than welcome to listen in — the stream is up on BlogTalkRadio’s site. The call-in # for questions will be (646)-915-9583 or you can tweet your questions to me @ArtsCultBeat or #artscultbeat. If you can’t listen in live, the link will still be available for you to hear later!

Re-upping, folks! We’re now live on air. Don’t forget to tweet your questions to @ArtsCultBeat or call in!

thepoliticalnotebook:

If any of you are interested — some of my Columbia classmates are interviewing jazz composer Maria Schneider today at 10AM EST on BlogTalkRadio

Maria Schneider is a multiple Grammy-winning Jazz composer. Schneider’s work defies genres. Her most recent album Winter Morning Walks incorporates the work of poet Ted Kooser, in a collaboration with soprano Dawn Upshaw. She talks to Arts and Culture Beat’s Danica Dow and Chris Ip about her work, her inspirations and her views on copyright.

You’re more than welcome to listen in — the stream is up on BlogTalkRadio’s site. The call-in # for questions will be (646)-915-9583 or you can tweet your questions to me @ArtsCultBeat or #artscultbeat. If you can’t listen in live, the link will still be available for you to hear later!

Re-upping, folks! We’re now live on air. Don’t forget to tweet your questions to @ArtsCultBeat or call in!

If any of you are interested — some of my Columbia classmates are interviewing jazz composer Maria Schneider today at 10AM EST on BlogTalkRadio. 

Maria Schneider is a multiple Grammy-winning Jazz composer. Schneider’s work defies genres. Her most recent album Winter Morning Walks incorporates the work of poet Ted Kooser, in a collaboration with soprano Dawn Upshaw. She talks to Arts and Culture Beat’s Danica Dow and Chris Ip about her work, her inspirations and her views on copyright.

You’re more than welcome to listen in — the stream is up on BlogTalkRadio’s site. The call-in # for questions will be (646)-915-9583 or you can tweet your questions to me @ArtsCultBeat or #artscultbeat. If you can’t listen in live, the link will still be available for you to hear later!

If any of you are interested — some of my Columbia classmates are interviewing jazz composer Maria Schneider today at 10AM EST on BlogTalkRadio

Maria Schneider is a multiple Grammy-winning Jazz composer. Schneider’s work defies genres. Her most recent album Winter Morning Walks incorporates the work of poet Ted Kooser, in a collaboration with soprano Dawn Upshaw. She talks to Arts and Culture Beat’s Danica Dow and Chris Ip about her work, her inspirations and her views on copyright.

You’re more than welcome to listen in — the stream is up on BlogTalkRadio’s site. The call-in # for questions will be (646)-915-9583 or you can tweet your questions to me @ArtsCultBeat or #artscultbeat. If you can’t listen in live, the link will still be available for you to hear later!

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.
If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.
The UN unanimously approved a 12,000-strong UN peacekeeping force in the Central African Republic.
It’s now been 20 years since the genocide in Rwanda — here, Tutsi survivors pose with Hutus who victimized them, and with whom they’ve since reconciled.
Colum Lynch reports a three-part series on the UN peacekeeping failure in Darfur: 1, 2, 3.
Doctors Without Borders accused the UN of ignoring horrible living conditions of 21,000 South Sudanese using part of the peacekeeping base in Juba as a refugee camp.
Clashes in Nigeria between Fulani cattle rustlers and Hausa vigilantes left 72 dead last Monday.
Two anti-piracy consultants for the UN were shot and killed in Galkayo, Somalia.  
Abdel-Rahman Shaheen is the latest Al Jazeera journalist to be arrested in Egypt. 
Infighting among Islamic rebel groups in Syria leaves 51 dead.
Drought looms in Syria.
American anti-tank weaponry shows up in Syrian rebel hands.
Dutch Jesuit priest Frans van der Lugt, who refused to evacuate Syria, where he lived for decades, was assassinated by a gunman outside his home in Homs. 
Netanyahu ordered his cabinet to cut communications with their Palestinian counterparts after Palestine requested to sign on to 15 international conventions. 
Iran’s Revolutionary Guard say they have captured a number of foreign agents entering from Iraq with intentions to carry out bombings and assassinations. 
Iran named Hamid Aboutalebi as its UN envoy — a provocative choice because Aboutalebi was a member of the student group who held Americans hostage in 1979 (although he was not himself directly involved in the event).
As last weekend’s votes in Afghanistan continue to be tallied, Ashraf Ghani and Abdullah Abdullah appear to be competing for the lead. A record number — 7 million people — turned out to vote. 
The Afghan government has begun an investigation into why a security officer, now in custody, killed AP photographer Anja Niedringhaus and wounded reporter Kathy Gannon.
A bomb on a stationary train in western Pakistan killed 14 on Tuesday.
22 were killed in a blast in Islamabad on Wednesday.
Pakistan plans to release 13 Taliban prisoners as part of peace negotiations. 
A new art project in Pakistan gives a face to civilian drone strike victims.
The Pakistani Taliban launched a website (link is to a news report, not to the actual website).
A Marine shot and killed another Marine at Camp Lejeune on Tuesday afternoon at the base’s main gate. 
Mexican self-defense groups refuse to disarm.
Pro-Russian violence leaks into Eastern Ukraine. 
An infographic on Eastern Ukrainian separatist movements.
The Washington Post on the special relationship between special operations and the FBI. 
Britain is increasing exercising its power to strip citizenship from suspected terrorists without prior court involvement — and then, of course, some of them end up getting killed in drone strikes.
The US is three years behind in the reports it is by law supposed to issue on potential sanctions violators. 
FBI investigation shows that Russia failed to provide some critical intelligence to the US about Tamerlan Tsarnaev.
Lawyers for Guantánamo prisoner Shaker Aamer are seeking his release on the grounds of failing health.
Alan Gross, the US contractor imprisoned in Cuba for the past four years, has gone on hunger strike.
According to further Snowden leaks, the US spied on groups like Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International (not particularly surprising, given historical record here).
Popular Mechanics rounds up a couple of military escalations you haven’t been hearing about. 
Roughly 5% ($500m) of the US defense budget will be spent developing electronic warfare systems. 
A Microsoft researcher makes the case that increased use of encryption inside intelligence agencies could rein in surveillance.
What you need to know about Heartbleed.
Hayden, the former CIA director, gets a bit sexist in his/the agency’s feud with Sen. Feinstein. 
A really awesome new invention for plugging battlefield wounds extra effectively gets FDA approval.
The Secret Service implements some internal clean-up efforts. 
Any NYC veterans reading the round-up: here are some events for free legal assistance at the end of April/beginning of May.
Some of things you shouldn’t say to returning veterans — and some of the things you should. 
Alex Horton eloquently rejects the post-traumatic stress narrative in the second Fort Hood shooting.
Photo: Zawa, Central African Republic. Anti-balaka military patrol. Goran Tomasevic/Reuters.


This Week in War
. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: Zawa, Central African Republic. Anti-balaka military patrol. Goran Tomasevic/Reuters.

“I am a war photographer, and I need to start working again." 
Spanish photojournalist Ricardo Garcia Vilanova was recently released from captivity in Syria, along with journalist Javier Espinosa. The pair were imprisoned for six months and were released just last weekend. 
Garcia Vilanova, however, is a freelancer — sent to Syria on spec. He is out seven months of work and all his equipment.
"I am spending time relaxing with my parents and my family,and then I need to find work," he says. "I need to find assignments. Six months without working, that’s not good."
Please consider donating!

I am a war photographer, and I need to start working again.

Spanish photojournalist Ricardo Garcia Vilanova was recently released from captivity in Syria, along with journalist Javier Espinosa. The pair were imprisoned for six months and were released just last weekend. 

Garcia Vilanova, however, is a freelancer — sent to Syria on spec. He is out seven months of work and all his equipment.

"I am spending time relaxing with my parents and my family,and then I need to find work," he says. "I need to find assignments. Six months without working, that’s not good."

Please consider donating!

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.
If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.
This morning, veteran Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus was killed in Khost, Afghanistan. She was killed instantly when an Afghan policeman opened fire on her car. Reporter Kathy Gannon, who was also in the car, was wounded.
Chad is withdrawing from African Union peacekeeping forces in the Central African Republic over criticism of its conduct.
The EU launched its military mission in CAR.
According to the UN, over a million have been displaced by violence in South Sudan.
The death toll in Syria is 150,000, with a third of those deaths civilians, says the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.
Spanish journalist and photographer Javier Espinosa and Ricardo Garcia Vilanova returned home after six months imprisonment by an Al Qaeda-affiliated group in Syria.
Lebanon registered its millionth refugee from Syria.
President Abbas took steps to join 15 international agencies, seeking increased statelike legitimacy for Palestine outside of the negotiating table. Peace talks between Israel and Palestine are faltering and the blame game is beginning.
The US is considering the release of Israeli spy Jonathan Pollard as part of negotiations. 
Egypt denied three Al Jazeera journalists bail.
Thirteen Bahrainis were sentenced to life in prison on charges of illegal protest and reportedly trying to kill a police officer. 
Iranian border guards held captive by an Al Qaeda-linked group on the Iran-Pakistan border have been freed.
The Washington Post interviews Special Inspector General for Afghan Reconstruction John Sopko on future challenges for oversight in Afghanistan.
March was the first month in over seven years where there were no US combat casualties in Afghanistan.
The situation in Afghanistan currently is highly tense, with elections being held on Saturday. Security forces said earlier this week that they had seized 22 tons of explosives and officials have shut down popular hangouts among foreigners in an attempt to decrease pre-election attacks on non-Afghans. Televised debates among the candidates were cancelled over security concerns. 
15 Taliban commanders were killed in Ghazni province when a suicide bomber detonated to block their plans to disrupt elections.
A suicide bombing at the Ministry of the Interior left six policemen dead. 
Pakistan’s PM released 16 Taliban prisoners as part of an attempt to strengthen peace talks. 
Talks are set to continue but the Pakistani Taliban’s ceasefire is over. 
Former Pakistani military ruler Pervez Musharraf, recently officially indicted on treason charges, narrowly escaped an assassination attempt. 
Pakistani journalist Raza Rumi also survived an attempted assassination when gunmen opened fire on his car. His driver was killed.
Pakistan will not be getting excess US military equipment from Afghanistan.
After India refused to declassify a controversial 1963 report on India’s defeat against China the year before, Australian journalist Neville Maxwell, who had obtained the report in 1970, released it on his blog.
An inquiry has concluded that Ukraine’s special Berkut police were the ones responsible for the shooting deaths of anti-government protesters. Ex-president Viktor Yanukovich is also receiving blame. 
General Breedlove, the top NATO commander, expressed concern that massed Russian troops were capable of mobilizing on Ukraine with 12 hours’ notice. 
An Iraq veteran opened fire at Fort Hood killing three and wounding sixteen before taking his own life. The soldier was being treated for post-traumatic stress, but many have urged caution over the impulse to connect post-traumatic stress to the shooting as the obvious explanation.
Author Cara Hoffman writes that women veterans’ experiences with homecoming, post-traumatic stress and acknowledgment for service are under-represented in literature and media: ”I can’t help but think women soldiers would be afforded the respect they deserve if their experiences were reflected in literature, film and art, if people could see their struggles, their resilience, their grief represented. “
The Senate Intelligence Committee voted on Thursday to declassify the CIA report on interrogation that concludes the agency’s extreme interrogation measures yielded little results and that the CIA actively misled government officials about the program.
ProPublica breaks down the three main legislative proposals regarding NSA reforms and what each would and wouldn’t do. 
New York Times reporter David Sanger talks to NPR Fresh Air about cyber war. 
Popular Mechanics tells the story of California state Senator Leland Yee’s corruption and arms dealing scandal by walking readers through the particular weapons involved. 

Photo: Kabul, Afghanistan. Afghan policemen atop their armored car rush to the scene of militant attacks on the Afghan election commission’s headquarters. Anja Niedringhaus/AP.

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: Kabul, Afghanistan. Afghan policemen atop their armored car rush to the scene of militant attacks on the Afghan election commission’s headquarters. Anja Niedringhaus/AP.

In his efforts to get Edmund just right, Williams consulted the rest of Shakespeare’s lexicon of antagonists and illegitimate sons, taking note from King John‘s Falconbridge, Iago in Othello and Richard III’s array of soliloquies in a number of the history plays. The answer to figuring out Shakespeare, Williams says, is usually more Shakespeare. “When questions arise like what the hell does that mean or why do I do that? in most cases if you continue reading the scene he’s figured it out for you.”
I got the chance to interview Chandler Williams, who’s playing the part of Edmund in Theater for a New Audience’s production of King Lear in Brooklyn.
Spanish journalist Javier Espinosa and photojournalist Ricardo Garcia Vilanova returned home today after six months held captive by an Al Qaeda-linked group in Syria. Above, Espinosa greets his son Yerai on the Torrejon military airport in Madrid.
Photo: AFP/Getty

Spanish journalist Javier Espinosa and photojournalist Ricardo Garcia Vilanova returned home today after six months held captive by an Al Qaeda-linked group in Syria. Above, Espinosa greets his son Yerai on the Torrejon military airport in Madrid.

Photo: AFP/Getty

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.
If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.
Egyptian General Abdul-Fatah al-Sisi, leader of last year’s military takeover, has announced his military resignation and presidential bid.
The leader of the Muslim Brotherhood and 682 others went on trial on a variety of charges, a day after the capital sentencing of 500 plus supporters of former president Morsi.
The Ethiopian government is importing European and Chinese technologies to spy on the electronic communications of the opposition.
William Langewiesche reports for GQ from South Sudan, where he observed G4S (a British “global security” contractor) and their ordnance-disposal teams in action.
A makeshift refugee camp near the airport in the Central African capital of Bangui holds tens of thousands of people in an incredibly precarious situation.
Peacekeepers in CAR have declared war against the anti-balaka, a Christian militant group, after the group’s attacks against their troops.
More than three million Nigerians are suffering the results of the Islamic militant uprising. [NOTE: The AP’s numbers on population percentages here seem to be really off - as a TWIW reader has noted. Grain of salt…]
The US is sending 150 USAF Special Operations forces and CV-22 Osprey aircraft to assist the Ugandan government in its efforts against Joseph Kony.
The Arab League summit was held this week despite deep tensions over Syria and Egypt.
Turkey blocked Twitter ahead of an electoral vote.
53.6% of Syria’s chemical weapons have been destroyed or removed. 
Turkey shot down a Syrian warplane.
Islamist rebels in Syria captured a small town on the Turkish border.
Syrian troops overtook the Crusader castle on the Lebanese border, a UNESCO world heritage site with symbolic value to the rebels who had controlled it since 2012.
20 members of Yemen’s security forces were killed in a militant raid on a checkpoint. 
The entire board of Iraq’s electoral commission resigned this week, citing political interference. 
RFE/RL’s Baghdad bureau chief, Mohammed Bdaiwai Owaid Al-Shammari, was shot dead by a member of the presidential guard. 
Reporters Without Borders expresses concern about Iraq’s official treatment of journalists.
A global spike in executions is sourced to those carried out in Iran and Iraq.
Iran says one of its five border guards held hostage by a militant group has been killed. 
Well-known Afghan journalist Sardar Ahmed, his wife and two of his three young children were among those killed by a militant gunman at the Serena Hotel last week.
The chief judge in former Pakistani leader Pervez Musharraf’s treason trial has quit, recusing himself after repeated accusations of bias against Musharraf. 
Peace talks began between the Pakistani government and the Pakistani Taliban.
A mass grave has been discovered in Bosnia, containing the remains of 147 Bosnian Muslims, believed to have been killed in 1992 in the town of Kozarac. 
Yulia Tymoshenko, Ukraine’s former prime minister, has announced a bid for the presidency.
Russia is re-investing in Afghanistan as the US pulls out. 
Russia calls on its prominent artists to publicly express support for the Crimean annexation, a move that many artists reject as a return to Soviet-era tactics. 
Increased signs of the annexation in Crimean daily life: the currency is now the ruble, and the Russian Investigative Committee has set up its new offices and legal procedures are in limbo.
Russia staged military training exercises in the separatist Moldovan region of Trans-Dniester, considered a possible next target for annexation.
CNN reports that a new US intelligence assessment believes that Russian incursion into eastern Ukraine is more likely than previously thought. 
According to Time, Putin’s aversion to texting presents a challenge to US spies. 
Japan is turning over more than 700 pounds of weapons-grade plutonium and 450 pounds of highly-enriched uranium to the US.
The death toll in Venezuelan protests rose to 34.
Tens of thousands of Chileans marched for constitutional reform.
On the rise and fall of unusual Army Special Forces Major Jim Gant. 
How British satellite company Inmarsat narrowed the search for flight MH370.
The White House prepares NSA reforms, which Shane Harris points out still contains wins for current NSA practices. 
Abu Ghaith, bin Laden’s son-in-law, was convicted of terrorism charges by a federal jury in New York City.
Photo: Raqqa province, Syria. An image from a militant website shows a group of fighters with the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), which has become entrenched in the province. Associated Press.

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: Raqqa province, Syria. An image from a militant website shows a group of fighters with the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), which has become entrenched in the province. Associated Press.

The New York Times story by Carlotta Gall on what Pakistan knew about bin Laden was censored in Pakistan’s edition, leaving a huge chunk of blank space on the front page.
[Via BBC correspondent Aleem Maqbool]

The New York Times story by Carlotta Gall on what Pakistan knew about bin Laden was censored in Pakistan’s edition, leaving a huge chunk of blank space on the front page.

[Via BBC correspondent Aleem Maqbool]

My attitude is, St. Patrick banished the snakes from Ireland and they all came here and they became conservatives. You eventually become the thing you hate the most.

Engraved Zippo lighters from the Vietnam War.

Cowan’s Auctions

“The Upper East Side is very inconvenient for 20-somethings,” Ms. Murray said. “The type of people we want to be with are all downtown.” She therefore conducts her social life in and around Union Square, and either waits an hour for the No. 6 train home in the wee hours of the morning or reluctantly ponies up for a cab.
The Times’ attempt to make me feel sorry for people my age who have to suffer the indignity of $2500 one bedroom “starter” flats on the Upper East Side dozens of blocks away from all NYC’s cool people was really unsuccessful. I mean, really you guys. 

Apologies again…

This Week in War is off again this week. I’ll do my best to continue it this spring, but some weeks just won’t be possible for me! Promise I’ll get fully back on track by May…

Newsweek didn’t want a theory, it wanted a scoop.
Felix Salmon has a great and thoughtful take on Newsweek’s big story on the identity of Bitcoin founder Satoshi Nakamoto (whom they identify, questionably at best, as a man named Dorian Nakamoto). 
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