…ISIL speaks for no religion. Their victims are overwhelmingly Muslim, and no faith teaches people to massacre innocents. No just God would stand for what they did yesterday and what they do every single day.
President Obama’s remarks on the beheading of journalist James Foley.

If you want to acknowledge James Foley’s death…

in a way that could offer some help to journalists in danger around the world — you can make a donation in his memory to the Committee to Protect Journalists so the organization can continue to work on their behalf.

…we believe the assassination of a journalist in wartime should be considered an international crime of war.
Gary Pruitt — the CEO and president of the Associated Press — in a statement released today on the apparent beheading of freelance journalist James Foley by the Islamic State.

The Guardian and This World

The Guardian has recently been criticized for running an ad (print only) by the organization This World — an ad featuring Elie Wiesel and saying, among other things, “Jews rejected child sacrifice 3,500 years ago. Now it’s Hamas’ turn.” (Newspapers in the US ran this ad, too, but that’s less surprising.)

Alan Rusbridger responded with a few interesting arguments — primarily that newspapers shouldn’t dismiss ads they disagree with and that it was a freedom of speech issue. Those are valid considerations when it comes to controversial advertising, but this wasn’t an ad for a political campaign or an advocacy group dealing with social issues — it was an ad about an ongoing conflict. And the ad used the child casualties of that conflict as a tool of emotional manipulation. That’s not an issue of whether or not the paper disagrees with a political stance; this is much more than that. The language of the ad was not just offensive to those who disagree with it — it was a base manipulation of the deaths of children.

One of my great disagreements with this choice — while it sounds admirable to forge ahead and publish ads you disagree with — is that it diminished and overshadowed the reporting from Gaza and Israel from Guardian journalists. Advertising should never overshadow the actual journalism, and that’s exactly what it did. When there is a clash between the two, the advertising should go. It is not, or should not be, more valuable to the publication. 

Read Guardian readers’ editor Chris Elliott’s good discussion of what happened.

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.
Four Egyptian protesters were killed on Thursday when security forces clashed with demonstrations to honor the one year anniversary of the crackdown on protesters in Rabaa which left a thousand dead. 
The police chief in Tripoli, Libya, has been assassinated.
The US sent $10 million in Pentagon emergency spending money to assist France’s fight against terrorism in northwestern Africa. 
The appointment of the Central African Republic’s first Muslim PM, Mahamat Kamoun, has been rejected by rebel group Seleka.
Israel and Gaza began a five day ceasefire on Thursday.
Rahed Taysir Al-Hom, who headed northern Gaza’s sole bomb disposal unit, died defusing an unexploded 500kg bomb on Wednesday.
AP videojournalist Simone Camilli and his freelance Palestinian translator Ali Shehda Abu Afash were killed when a previously unexploded bomb detonated in Gaza.
For Gaza’s wounded, and its overwhelmed hospitals, an excruciating battle continues.
Canadian law professor William Schabas has been appointed head of the UN’s commission to investigate Israel for war crimes in Gaza — to Israel’s vocal displeasure.
Assad’s forces have retaken Mleiha, a key Damascus district.
The Islamic State has seized a number of towns in Aleppo.
After weeks of struggle, Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki agreed to step down, accepting Haider al-Abadi’s candidacy.
The rise of Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi and of the Islamic State/ISIS and its inextricable connection to US involvement in Iraq.
The Islamic States is putting effort into establishing cells outside of Syria and Iraq.
IS seizes on wheat supplies as an economic weapon.
Watch Vice’s full-length documentary on ISIS here.
The situation with the Yazidis stranded on Mount Sinjar seems to have both markedly improved and been overestimated in the first place… did US intelligence misjudge the humanitarian situation? Yazidi leaders strongly resist the claim that the crisis is over.
A helicopter delivering aid on Tuesday in northern Iraq crashed, killing the pilot, and injuring New York Times reporter Alissa Rubin.
EU foreign ministers are holding an emergency meeting in Brussels today to discussing arming the Kurds.
Attah Mohammed Noor — Balkh province’s governor, former warlord, and powerful ally of Abdullah Abdullah — has warned of “civil unrest” should the vote recount be biased.
Pakistan foiled a militant attack on an airbase on the outskirts of Quetta.
Pro-Russian separatists in Donetsk on Wednesday ambushed a Bush carrying Ukrainian soldiers — twelve of whom were killed. An unknown number were taken captive.
Russian Alexander Borodai has resigned as prime minister of the separatist Donetsk People’s Republic, ceding the title to a Ukrainian named Alexander Zakharchenko. Its military leader, Igor Girkin — AKA Strelkov — has also resigned.
Tensions between Russia and Ukraine are aggravated by a Russian aid convoy to the separatists.
Putin sought to act as peacemaker between Azerbaijan and Armenia after renewed fighting over the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh territory has resulted in dozens of deaths recently. Both Azerbaijan and Armenia, however, are skeptical of Russian intentions — both agreeing that Russia should not send in peacekeeping forces.
Azerbaijan has detained four of its most prominent human rights activists and advocates. 
NATO is close to an agreement to bolster its presence in Eastern Europe.
WIRED profiles Edward Snowden.
Former DARPA head Regina Duggan reportedly violated internal ethics regulations in discussing products sold by the company she founded with Pentagon officials during her tenure. 
I wrote a feature article for The Atlantic online about a war photograph from Desert Storm. 
Photo: Al Shaaf neighborhood of Gaza City. A Palestinian man surveys the destruction. Alessio Romenzi for TIME.

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.

Photo: Al Shaaf neighborhood of Gaza City. A Palestinian man surveys the destruction. Alessio Romenzi for TIME.

We rolled lighter than that in an actual war zone.
A Twitter user/former veteran quoted in Paul Szoldra’s fascinating Business Insider piece detailing the militarization of police in Ferguson, Missouri right now (emblematic of police militarization across the country) — MRAPs, and M4 carbine and MARPAT look-alikes.

The War Photo No One Would Publish

Check it out — I’ve got a feature article up online at The Atlantlc. I’m really pleased to have had the chance to report on this photograph.

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.
The prime minister of the Central African Republic and his cabinet have resigned.
Clashes in CAR are threatening last month’s ceasefire deal.
Libya’s congress has called for a UN-backed ceasefire.
Egypt signed a $3m per year lobbying contract to help keep the US-Egypt relationship on good footing.
Fighting along the border between Sudan and South Sudan is threatening to merge two conflicts.
Human Rights Watch says that atrocities in South Sudan amount to war crimes.
In photos: Gaza after the bombardment.
In Israel, to be anti-war is to be ostracized/vilified/threatened…
The cease-fire in Gaza has ended and not been renewed. Rockets were launched from Gaza and Israel has resumed airstrikes. Talks are not progressing in Cairo.
Atef Abu Saif’s eight day war diary from Gaza shows the minutiae of life under the shelling.
Amnesty International calls for an investigation into evidence that Israel is actively targeting health care workers.
Foreign Policy reports that European powers have drawn up a plan for a UN mission to oversee the end of the blockade on Gaza and the destruction of Hamas’ tunnel system.
A horrifying dispatch from the scene of a barrel bombing in Aleppo.
The Syrian civil war continues to threaten Lebanon.
ISIS stormed one of the Syrian government’s last bases in Raqqa.
President Obama has authorized limited airstrikes against ISIS in Iraq.
ISIS has trapped 50,000 Yazidis in the mountains of northwestern Iraq, creating a terrible humanitarian crisis. Who are the Yazidis?
Bahrain convicted nine opposition activists of “public security charges,” stripping them of citizenship.
Major General Harold Greene was killed in a green-on-blue attack in Afghanistan this week — the first US general officer to be killed in either the war in Iraq or Afghanistan.
The US system of tracking weapons shipments to Afghanistan is faulty — failing to the extent that it isn’t known how many weapons are missing.
An Indian soldier who accidentally crossed the border has been detained by Pakistan.
RFE/RL explains the ongoing conflict between Azerbaijan and Armenia in the Nagorno-Karabakh region.
A female journalist has written a blunt and damning essay about her recent rape in Ukraine by a “Very Respected Journalist.”
"Has Russia invaded us yet?" — the slow invasion of Ukraine.
Russia bans food imports from the US and EU.
Edward Snowden has been given permission to stay in Russia for at least another three years.
Former Georgian president Mikhail Saakashvili is being prosecuted for human rights violations and abuse of power, but his allies (like Sen. John McCain) are standing by their man.
Two Khmer Rouge leaders have been sentenced to life in prison by the UN-backed tribunal in Cambodia.
The New York Times will now use the word “torture” to describe… well, torture.
Troop charity Move America Forward is outed by ProPublica for its fundraising fakery and funneling proceeds into PACs and political consulting firms.
Photo: Shejaiya neighborhood, Gaza City. A man enters his shattered home on a mostly destroyed street. August 7. Roberto Schmidt/AFP/Getty
If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

Photo: Shejaiya neighborhood, Gaza City. A man enters his shattered home on a mostly destroyed street. August 7. Roberto Schmidt/AFP/Getty

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Hello from the Great North Woods

Hello from the Great North Woods

Maybe it's the most generic question there is, but what are your tips for somebody just starting in your line of work? — Asked by iposlekvo

It’s really quite amusing to me to be asked for career advice at this stage in my life. This implies that I’ve moved beyond the early phases and on to a more glamorous life of job security. In many ways, I really ought to be on the receiving end of advice rather than the other way around. However, I have a decent and happy few years of freelancing under my belt and here’s what I know works and what I’m hoping continues to work for me:

  • Read everything.
  • Be serious about journalism if that’s what you pick. It’s not an easy hustle and it’s something that demands a lot of diligence and commitment and flat out caring about it. Work towards an idea of what kind of journalist you want to be/think you already are and make your plans and choices based on that.
  • Be bold in those choices and then have a decently thick skin about rejection. Read this for moral support.

To go along with this question, here’s another related one I just got:

image

The answer is both. I freelanced for a few years before heading off to do a degree (graduate level) in journalism. Journalism school is actually not the opposite of making your own way — I want to make it very clear that a journalism degree, however many things it will teach you and offer you, does not neatly map a possible profession out or create a whole pathway for you to follow.

So have you ever read Gannon's "I is for Infdel"? It's one of the better books I've read about Afghanistan. — Asked by tmoswole

No, but I’m generally familiar with Gannon’s reporting. I’ll put it on my list! Thanks.

(Posting for anyone up for what seems like a solid read about Afghanistan.)

Just a reminder that my inbox is open...

So you can talk at me about the blog, ask me things, say hi or recommend books. 

Hi.

This morning CPJ received a message from the Pakistani Taliban

committeetoprotectjournalists:

As a service to our Pakistani colleagues in the media we will pass along this latest threat, one in a steady never-ending stream of threats, from a group with the power to wreak real mayhem and murder. For almost all of colleagues, it’s not the first time they will be threatened. And just as…

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.
Israel and Hamas have agreed to a 72 hour humanitarian ceasefire, which has already effectively collapsed amid heavy exchanges of fire a few hours in.
The sixth UN school in Gaza was shelled by Israel on Wednesday.
A regularly updated infographic from the Washington Post of the casualties from war waged on Gaza.
On Tuesday, 11 members of a Gazan family were killed in a single strike. 
What a strike on Gaza looks like as it happens.
Rashid Khalidi on collective punishment in Gaza.
Israel calls up 16,000 reservists.
Palestinian photojournalist Rami Rayan and TV journalist Sameh Al-Aryan were both killed Wednesday in an Israeli strike on a market in the Shujaya neighborhood of Gaza City.
A Hezbollah commander was killed in Iraq sometime in the past week, say Lebanese officials. 
Syrian rebels develop a rechargeable battery to power their shoulder-fired anti-aircraft missiles.
On Thursday, a disguised Syrian defector briefed the House Foreign Affairs Committee, bringing with him horrifying photos of starved and tortured bodies — all victims of Assad’s forces. The photos (warning, disturbing and graphic) are here.
Barrel bomb use in Syria is dramatically increasing.
Al-Qaeda-linked rebels have taken control of Benghazi.
6,000 people a day are fleeing Libya for Tunisia.
ISIS destroys cultural heritage sites in Iraq.
From PBS Frontline: “Losing Iraq.”
The US is considering its “largest ever” shipment of Hellfire missiles to Iraq.
Ukraine warns that the MH17 crash site may be mined.
International investigators finally made it to the site this week.
From Reuters: where do Ukrainian separatists get their weapons?
According to NATO, the number of Russian troops along the Ukrainian is increasing, now at a healthy 12,000+.
The US accuses Russia of violating the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty with test launches. But why did the US wait so long (years) to call them out?
The EU adopted tough sanctions against Russia, curbing arms sales and targeting banks.
New Russian legislation goes into effect today to tighten government control of blogging and social media activities.
Afghanistan reconstruction is costing the US more than the Marshall Plan.
The Abu Sayyaf militant group attacked vehicles headed to Eid celebrations in the Philippines, killing 18.
Thailand’s military junta appointed an interim legislature.
As a result of improperly targeting veterans, the University of Phoenix is barred from enrolling veterans in seven of its programs.
The retiring commander of US Special Operations Command — Adm. William McRaven — will become chancellor of the University of Texas system.
Former NSA director Keith Alexander wants to charge companies a million dollars per month to help protect themselves against cyber crime? Here’s why he thinks he’s worth it.
A nuclear policy specialist at Los Alamos National Labs was let go in what he says is retribution for an article he wrote supporting a future free of nuclear weapons. The article has been retroactively classified.
The CIA admits that it tapped the computers of Senate staffers who were looking into interrogation practices.
Lawyers for Blackwater contractors charged in the Nisour Square killings are accusing the government of withholding evidence favorable to the defendants.
The parole board has cleared 37-year-old Kuwaiti Guantánamo detainee Fawzi al Odah for release.
The Senate approved an overhaul of the Veterans Affairs department — sending it to President Obama for a signature.
Derek Chollet, Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs, will be leaving his position in January.
How do you make anti-war art that doesn’t in some way find beauty in what it describes?
I wrote about the short fiction being published by veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan.
Photo: Soot clouds from heavy Israeli air strikes rise over Gaza City. Tuesday, July 29. Mohammed Saber/EPA.
If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

Photo: Soot clouds from heavy Israeli air strikes rise over Gaza City. Tuesday, July 29. Mohammed Saber/EPA.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

We are waiting here to see if we are meant to live or die. Every day is another day of fear and destruction. If you don’t die, someone you know is likely to be among the dead. This is no life a human being can accept.

A Palestinian commenting on conditions inside Gaza. 

(Via +972 Mag)

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