Reports have come in that ISIS has now also beheaded American journalist Steven Sotloff

… and threatened the life of Briton David Cawthorne Haines. 

To honor Sotloff, a man who reported on civilian suffering in dangerous circumstances with a lot of compassion, read a selection of his work here at Foreign Policy and at TIMEAlso consider a donation in his honor to the Committee to Protect Journalists.

Rest in peace.

Today’s the 20th anniversary of the 1994 IRA ceasefire. 
And from the BBC — Northern Ireland then and now.
[Irish Times front page from 1994 via @ElaineEdwardsIT on Twitter.]

Today’s the 20th anniversary of the 1994 IRA ceasefire. 

And from the BBC — Northern Ireland then and now.

[Irish Times front page from 1994 via @ElaineEdwardsIT on Twitter.]

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.
Representatives for two rebel groups in Mali agreed to end hostilities and join together for peace talks with the government next month.
Riek Machar’s rebel group in South Sudan have rejected a power-sharing deal.
Vice reports on weapons moving into South Sudan.
17 were killed in in-fighting among factions of the Seleka rebel group in the Central African Republic.
Abdullah al-Thinni has resigned as Libya’s prime minister in an attempt to end a power struggle. 
Egypt and the UAE have secretly carried out airstrikes in Libya.
An indefinite ceasefire was brokered between Israel and Gaza.
Scenes from on the ground in Gaza and Israel — captured by photographers Paolo Pellegrin and Peter van Agtmael.
The UN says that 3 million people have fled Syria in the current conflict, and another 6.5 million have been internally displaced.
American journalist Peter Theo Curtis, who has published under the name Theo Padnos, was released from captivity in Syria this week. He was held by the Nusra Front.
His release was secured with the help of Qatar, who are continuing to try to negotiate the release of other Western hostages — one of whom is now known to be an American aid worker held by ISIS.
Steve Coll on the kidnapping of journalists.
ISIS captives, including James Foley, were waterboarded.
Evan Hill remembers his correspondence with Foley.
The mother of captive journalist Steven Sotloff has released a video plea to ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi for her son’s freedom.
Ben Hubbard and Eric Schmitt report on ISIS’s management and organizational structure.
One piece of reporting indicates that there is support among non-extremist rebels in Syria for US action against ISIS, saying that ISIS has “ravaged” Syria and hijacked their revolution.
Public beheadings have become a “common spectacle" in Syria, according to the UN.
Two journalists acquired an ISIS laptop — full of “how-tos” for weaponizing the bubonic plague, among other things.
A 33-year-old US citizen — Douglas McCain — was killed fighting for ISIS in Syria. US intelligence has reportedly identified almost a dozen Americans who have similarly traveled abroad to join ISIS.
43 UN peacekeepers are being held by an armed group in Syrian Golan Heights.
Mapping ISIS’ development and expansion in Syria and Iraq.
In Iraq, ISIS is accused of ethnic cleansing in a prison massacre in Mosul where 670 Shia prisoners were reportedly killed.
US airstrikes in Iraq, day by day.
Armed Yemeni rebels staged sit ins this week outside the capital city, Sanaa, protesting the government.
An ongoing, bloody Taliban offensive in southern Afghanistan has killed as many as 900 in some of the “worst fighting” in years.
Afghanistan’s disputed presidential election is costing the country ‘s economy $5bn. 
PM Sharif has been named by Pakistani police as a murder suspect in the deaths of 14 protesters near Lahore in June.
Thousands of Pakistani demonstrators, lead by Tahir ul-Qadri and Imran Khan, have camped out in front of parliament in Islamabad since mid-August demanding Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif step down. Pakistan’s army chief has now been named mediator in the crisis.
Russia has opened up a new offensive in Ukraine and NATO has accused Russia of “blatant violation" of Ukrainian sovereignty.
Ukrainian soldiers coming out of Novoazovsk say they were “cannon fodder" for Russian tanks.
Ukraine’s prime minister announced the country’s renewed intentions to join NATO.
In photos: what remains of Donetsk.
The debate over Russia’s invasion/incursion plays out, of course, on Twitter.
Obama announced executive actions to benefit veterans, soldiers and military families.
The prosecution rests in the Blackwater trial.
Photo: Donetsk, Ukraine. A damaged and bloody kitchen in downtown Donetsk. Sergei Ilnitsky/EPA.

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.

Photo: Donetsk, Ukraine. A damaged and bloody kitchen in downtown Donetsk. Sergei Ilnitsky/EPA.

BREAKING: American journalist Peter Theo Curtis has reportedly been released from captivity in Syria.
After disappearing in October of 2012, Curtis was apparently handed over to the UN today (Sunday). Photo above is a still from a June video showing Curtis alive, if somewhat the worse for wear.
[Al Jazeera]

BREAKINGAmerican journalist Peter Theo Curtis has reportedly been released from captivity in Syria.

After disappearing in October of 2012, Curtis was apparently handed over to the UN today (Sunday). Photo above is a still from a June video showing Curtis alive, if somewhat the worse for wear.

[Al Jazeera]

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.
Journalist James Foley was beheaded on video by an Islamic State militant on Tuesday. Foley, who had been captured in November of 2012, was murdered by a man with a British accent, prompting rapid investigation into the militant’s identity. 
The video also showed and threatened the life of another captive journalist - Steven Sotloff. Read more about him here. As Richard Engel reports, IS has been buying, trading, and stealing hostages from other Syrian groups.
Journalist James Rohde, himself a former Taliban prisoner, wrote in a piece for The Atlantic that US unwillingness to negotiate with IS or pay a ransom for the release of captured journalists failed Foley. 
The Pentagon has said a Delta Force rescue was attempted over the summer, to no success.
Also at issue is the widespread use of freelancers in war zone reporting an experience written about last summer by Italian freelancer Francesca Borri.
Jon Lee Anderson comments in The New Yorker: “Yesterday’s guerrillas have given way to terrorists, and now terrorists have given way to this new band, who are something like serial killers”
Read a selection of Foley’s reporting for GlobalPost.
The lawyers for three Al Jazeera staff jailed in Egypt have filed an appeal.
Tunisia and Egypt halted flights into and out of Libya over security concerns related to militia fighting.
Shots were fired in the Liberian capital of Monrovia during protests over an Ebola quarantine in West Point slum.
Boko Haram seized a police academy.
Clashes in the Central African Republic’s capital, Bangui, between the militia and peacekeepers have intensified — killing five, including a Red Cross worker. Last weekend, 34 were killed in Bangui when members of the Seleka rebel group conducted a series of armed raids. As a result, the UN is increasing the number of peacekeepers in the country.
Egyptian peacekeepers will be sent to support UN efforts in CAR, Mali and Sudan.
Conflict over territorial disputes between Rezeigat and Maaliya tribes in Darfur has left 70 dead.
An Israeli airstrike killed 3 Hamas commanders in Gaza and airstrikes continue.
According to Haaretz, Germany, France and Britain have begun work on a Security Council resolution intended to end fighting in Gaza — granting the Palestinian Authority control over Gaza, internationally supervised reconstruction with the aim of preventing Hamas from re-arming and peace talks based on pre-1967 boundaries.
Rights activists say Lebanese media freedoms are at risk.
The estimated number of dead in the Syrian conflict is now 191,000, according to the UN.
The US says it has completed destruction of the Syrian chemical weapons arsenal.
In Iraq, US weaponry intended for the Iraqi army has fallen into IS hands.
New Jersey-born Sharif Mobley is charged with murder in Yemen (downgraded from terrorism suspicions), yet his lawyers don’t know where he is.
A photojournalist held in Iran has been released, but Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian remains in custody.
The Afghan government expelled and banned New York Times reporter Matthew Rosenberg from the country for reporting it found threatening.
Matthieu Aikins writes in Rolling Stone about times changing for the worse for the expat community in Afghanistan.
The US has released 9 Pakistani prisoners from Bagram.
The US is offering $30m for information on Haqqani leadership.
Long-running border disputes in India’s northeastern Assam state have erupted in clashes, resulting in a dozen dead and 10,000 displaced. 
Street battles and heavy shelling in Donetsk, Ukraine have killed dozens — and the overall civilian/combatant death toll in the ongoing conflict is more than 2000.
The first trucks of a massive, 270-truck Russian aid convoy have cleared customs in eastern Ukraine.
A rocket strike on a refugee convoy in eastern Ukraine and killed 15 refugees. 
Over the past couple of weeks, a number of the pro-Russian rebel leaders have stepped aside.
An interview with photojournalist Mauricio Lima, who has been on assignment for the New York Times in Ukraine for the past month.
Kosovo arrested 40 men suspected of having fought in rebel groups in Syria and Iraq.
At The New York Times, Ravi Somaiya and Christine Haughney write on the increased global targeting of journalists.
The Guardian and the Texas Observer have teamed up to produce a four part series of reports on the humanitarian/immigration crisis at the US-Mexican border and in Central America.
Mexico says 22,322 people have “disappeared" since the drug war began in 2006.
The US says it plans to amend the process by which people can challenge their inclusion on the no-fly list. 
I encourage you to donate something to the Committee to Protect Journalists in Foley’s name, so they can continue to work to protect reporters in danger around the world. (Other organizations that support and protect journalists include the Rory Peck Trust, RISC and Reporters Without Borders.)
Photo: Gaza Strip. Two men, Adel and Mohammed, in the only room left in their house not utterly destroyed. August 16. Roberto Schmidt/AFP/Getty.

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.

I encourage you to donate something to the Committee to Protect Journalists in Foley’s name, so they can continue to work to protect reporters in danger around the world. (Other organizations that support and protect journalists include the Rory Peck Trust, RISC and Reporters Without Borders.)

Photo: Gaza Strip. Two men, Adel and Mohammed, in the only room left in their house not utterly destroyed. August 16. Roberto Schmidt/AFP/Getty.

…ISIL speaks for no religion. Their victims are overwhelmingly Muslim, and no faith teaches people to massacre innocents. No just God would stand for what they did yesterday and what they do every single day.
President Obama’s remarks on the beheading of journalist James Foley.

If you want to acknowledge James Foley’s death…

in a way that could offer some help to journalists in danger around the world — you can make a donation in his memory to the Committee to Protect Journalists so the organization can continue to work on their behalf.

…we believe the assassination of a journalist in wartime should be considered an international crime of war.
Gary Pruitt — the CEO and president of the Associated Press — in a statement released today on the apparent beheading of freelance journalist James Foley by the Islamic State.

The Guardian and This World

The Guardian has recently been criticized for running an ad (print only) by the organization This World — an ad featuring Elie Wiesel and saying, among other things, “Jews rejected child sacrifice 3,500 years ago. Now it’s Hamas’ turn.” (Newspapers in the US ran this ad, too, but that’s less surprising.)

Alan Rusbridger responded with a few interesting arguments — primarily that newspapers shouldn’t dismiss ads they disagree with and that it was a freedom of speech issue. Those are valid considerations when it comes to controversial advertising, but this wasn’t an ad for a political campaign or an advocacy group dealing with social issues — it was an ad about an ongoing conflict. And the ad used the child casualties of that conflict as a tool of emotional manipulation. That’s not an issue of whether or not the paper disagrees with a political stance; this is much more than that. The language of the ad was not just offensive to those who disagree with it — it was a base manipulation of the deaths of children.

One of my great disagreements with this choice — while it sounds admirable to forge ahead and publish ads you disagree with — is that it diminished and overshadowed the reporting from Gaza and Israel from Guardian journalists. Advertising should never overshadow the actual journalism, and that’s exactly what it did. When there is a clash between the two, the advertising should go. It is not, or should not be, more valuable to the publication. 

Read Guardian readers’ editor Chris Elliott’s good discussion of what happened.

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.
Four Egyptian protesters were killed on Thursday when security forces clashed with demonstrations to honor the one year anniversary of the crackdown on protesters in Rabaa which left a thousand dead. 
The police chief in Tripoli, Libya, has been assassinated.
The US sent $10 million in Pentagon emergency spending money to assist France’s fight against terrorism in northwestern Africa. 
The appointment of the Central African Republic’s first Muslim PM, Mahamat Kamoun, has been rejected by rebel group Seleka.
Israel and Gaza began a five day ceasefire on Thursday.
Rahed Taysir Al-Hom, who headed northern Gaza’s sole bomb disposal unit, died defusing an unexploded 500kg bomb on Wednesday.
AP videojournalist Simone Camilli and his freelance Palestinian translator Ali Shehda Abu Afash were killed when a previously unexploded bomb detonated in Gaza.
For Gaza’s wounded, and its overwhelmed hospitals, an excruciating battle continues.
Canadian law professor William Schabas has been appointed head of the UN’s commission to investigate Israel for war crimes in Gaza — to Israel’s vocal displeasure.
Assad’s forces have retaken Mleiha, a key Damascus district.
The Islamic State has seized a number of towns in Aleppo.
After weeks of struggle, Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki agreed to step down, accepting Haider al-Abadi’s candidacy.
The rise of Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi and of the Islamic State/ISIS and its inextricable connection to US involvement in Iraq.
The Islamic States is putting effort into establishing cells outside of Syria and Iraq.
IS seizes on wheat supplies as an economic weapon.
Watch Vice’s full-length documentary on ISIS here.
The situation with the Yazidis stranded on Mount Sinjar seems to have both markedly improved and been overestimated in the first place… did US intelligence misjudge the humanitarian situation? Yazidi leaders strongly resist the claim that the crisis is over.
A helicopter delivering aid on Tuesday in northern Iraq crashed, killing the pilot, and injuring New York Times reporter Alissa Rubin.
EU foreign ministers are holding an emergency meeting in Brussels today to discussing arming the Kurds.
Attah Mohammed Noor — Balkh province’s governor, former warlord, and powerful ally of Abdullah Abdullah — has warned of “civil unrest” should the vote recount be biased.
Pakistan foiled a militant attack on an airbase on the outskirts of Quetta.
Pro-Russian separatists in Donetsk on Wednesday ambushed a Bush carrying Ukrainian soldiers — twelve of whom were killed. An unknown number were taken captive.
Russian Alexander Borodai has resigned as prime minister of the separatist Donetsk People’s Republic, ceding the title to a Ukrainian named Alexander Zakharchenko. Its military leader, Igor Girkin — AKA Strelkov — has also resigned.
Tensions between Russia and Ukraine are aggravated by a Russian aid convoy to the separatists.
Putin sought to act as peacemaker between Azerbaijan and Armenia after renewed fighting over the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh territory has resulted in dozens of deaths recently. Both Azerbaijan and Armenia, however, are skeptical of Russian intentions — both agreeing that Russia should not send in peacekeeping forces.
Azerbaijan has detained four of its most prominent human rights activists and advocates. 
NATO is close to an agreement to bolster its presence in Eastern Europe.
WIRED profiles Edward Snowden.
Former DARPA head Regina Duggan reportedly violated internal ethics regulations in discussing products sold by the company she founded with Pentagon officials during her tenure. 
I wrote a feature article for The Atlantic online about a war photograph from Desert Storm. 
Photo: Al Shaaf neighborhood of Gaza City. A Palestinian man surveys the destruction. Alessio Romenzi for TIME.

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.

Photo: Al Shaaf neighborhood of Gaza City. A Palestinian man surveys the destruction. Alessio Romenzi for TIME.

We rolled lighter than that in an actual war zone.
A Twitter user/former veteran quoted in Paul Szoldra’s fascinating Business Insider piece detailing the militarization of police in Ferguson, Missouri right now (emblematic of police militarization across the country) — MRAPs, and M4 carbine and MARPAT look-alikes.

The War Photo No One Would Publish

Check it out — I’ve got a feature article up online at The Atlantlc. I’m really pleased to have had the chance to report on this photograph.

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.
The prime minister of the Central African Republic and his cabinet have resigned.
Clashes in CAR are threatening last month’s ceasefire deal.
Libya’s congress has called for a UN-backed ceasefire.
Egypt signed a $3m per year lobbying contract to help keep the US-Egypt relationship on good footing.
Fighting along the border between Sudan and South Sudan is threatening to merge two conflicts.
Human Rights Watch says that atrocities in South Sudan amount to war crimes.
In photos: Gaza after the bombardment.
In Israel, to be anti-war is to be ostracized/vilified/threatened…
The cease-fire in Gaza has ended and not been renewed. Rockets were launched from Gaza and Israel has resumed airstrikes. Talks are not progressing in Cairo.
Atef Abu Saif’s eight day war diary from Gaza shows the minutiae of life under the shelling.
Amnesty International calls for an investigation into evidence that Israel is actively targeting health care workers.
Foreign Policy reports that European powers have drawn up a plan for a UN mission to oversee the end of the blockade on Gaza and the destruction of Hamas’ tunnel system.
A horrifying dispatch from the scene of a barrel bombing in Aleppo.
The Syrian civil war continues to threaten Lebanon.
ISIS stormed one of the Syrian government’s last bases in Raqqa.
President Obama has authorized limited airstrikes against ISIS in Iraq.
ISIS has trapped 50,000 Yazidis in the mountains of northwestern Iraq, creating a terrible humanitarian crisis. Who are the Yazidis?
Bahrain convicted nine opposition activists of “public security charges,” stripping them of citizenship.
Major General Harold Greene was killed in a green-on-blue attack in Afghanistan this week — the first US general officer to be killed in either the war in Iraq or Afghanistan.
The US system of tracking weapons shipments to Afghanistan is faulty — failing to the extent that it isn’t known how many weapons are missing.
An Indian soldier who accidentally crossed the border has been detained by Pakistan.
RFE/RL explains the ongoing conflict between Azerbaijan and Armenia in the Nagorno-Karabakh region.
A female journalist has written a blunt and damning essay about her recent rape in Ukraine by a “Very Respected Journalist.”
"Has Russia invaded us yet?" — the slow invasion of Ukraine.
Russia bans food imports from the US and EU.
Edward Snowden has been given permission to stay in Russia for at least another three years.
Former Georgian president Mikhail Saakashvili is being prosecuted for human rights violations and abuse of power, but his allies (like Sen. John McCain) are standing by their man.
Two Khmer Rouge leaders have been sentenced to life in prison by the UN-backed tribunal in Cambodia.
The New York Times will now use the word “torture” to describe… well, torture.
Troop charity Move America Forward is outed by ProPublica for its fundraising fakery and funneling proceeds into PACs and political consulting firms.
Photo: Shejaiya neighborhood, Gaza City. A man enters his shattered home on a mostly destroyed street. August 7. Roberto Schmidt/AFP/Getty
If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

Photo: Shejaiya neighborhood, Gaza City. A man enters his shattered home on a mostly destroyed street. August 7. Roberto Schmidt/AFP/Getty

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Hello from the Great North Woods

Hello from the Great North Woods

Maybe it's the most generic question there is, but what are your tips for somebody just starting in your line of work? — Asked by iposlekvo

It’s really quite amusing to me to be asked for career advice at this stage in my life. This implies that I’ve moved beyond the early phases and on to a more glamorous life of job security. In many ways, I really ought to be on the receiving end of advice rather than the other way around. However, I have a decent and happy few years of freelancing under my belt and here’s what I know works and what I’m hoping continues to work for me:

  • Read everything.
  • Be serious about journalism if that’s what you pick. It’s not an easy hustle and it’s something that demands a lot of diligence and commitment and flat out caring about it. Work towards an idea of what kind of journalist you want to be/think you already are and make your plans and choices based on that.
  • Be bold in those choices and then have a decently thick skin about rejection. Read this for moral support.

To go along with this question, here’s another related one I just got:

image

The answer is both. I freelanced for a few years before heading off to do a degree (graduate level) in journalism. Journalism school is actually not the opposite of making your own way — I want to make it very clear that a journalism degree, however many things it will teach you and offer you, does not neatly map a possible profession out or create a whole pathway for you to follow.

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