Ultimately, the musician’s political voice is a voice for freedom of speech and expression. It is one of the most central elements of these protests: the desire and the demand to be genuinely free in that most basic of senses.

I have a review essay, titled "The Rhythms of Egypt’s Revolutionaries,” up on Jadaliyya, examining a new France24 web documentary: “The Songs of Tahrir Square: Music at the Heart of the Revolution.”

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