This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.
Egypt experienced a power turnaround for the second time in two years, as the army ousted the democratically-elected Morsi following days of popular protest. Chief Justice Adly Mansour was sworn in as interim leader only hours later. 
Syrian opposition fighters claim to be in control of most of the city of Dara’a.
Moises Saman photographs the “nowhere people,” Syrian refugees, in black and white. 
An ordinary day in Aleppo. A brief report from a day in the life of a photojournalist documenting the rebel fighters in Aleppo [in French].
Former Chad leader Hissene Habre has been charged with torture and crimes against humanity by a Senegalese court.
The UN began its military mission in Mali.
Iran’s president-elect has publicly promised to engage with the West.
Kate Clark writes that ISAF/The US did not simply fail to talk with the Taliban in 2002, but actively targeted them despite attempts to surrender and peaceably lay down arms.
A new study shows that drone strikes cause ten times the civilian casualties that strikes conducted by manned aircraft do. This contradicts the standardized claim that drone strikes are more precise and surgical as a tool of war.
In Afghanistan, Helmand province’s top female police officer was gunned down Thursday morning.
A truck bomb struck in Kabul for the fourth consecutive Tuesday, killing seven.
The Special Inspector General for Afghan Reconstruction has raised concerns over he three-quarter billion dollar purchase of helicopters for an Afghan aviation unit that lacks the manpower and expertise to use or maintain them.
UK forces have begun transferring detainees to Afghanistan.
A US drone strike killed 17 in northwest Pakistan.
On foreign journalists being kicked out of Pakistan.
Amnesty International claims that Russia and the Ukraine have been forcibly returning asylum-seekers to Central Asia in unlawful transfers. These people face risk of torture upon their return.
The Police Service of Northern Ireland will review the Historical Enquiries Team following the release of a report showing they were “less rigorous in [their] investigation of British state killings than of paramilitary killings.” 
Colombia’s FARC and the ELN (National Liberation Army) are in unification talks.
A plane carrying the Bolivian president home was turned around in European airspace based on suspicion that Snowden was on board. There is significant anger on the part of Bolivia and other Latin American countries.
A hidden bug was found in Ecuador’s London embassy (where Assange is staying), and an angry Ecuador is threatening to reveal who planted it.
The US government rested its case in the trial of Bradley Manning. The defense will begin Monday, aiming to have some of his charges dismissed. 
The USPS is subjected to the same metadata mining as telecommunications, with the exteriors of all mail being photographed and stored for an unknown period of time. 
The Washington Post decodes some PowerPoint slides on PRISM.
Reports that the US is bugging European allies have been met with anger. Angela Merkel calls it “extremely serious,” European firms will probably quit American Internet service providers, and upcoming trade negotiations have been complicated. Germany and the US will begin talks to alleviate the damage.
France has run its own NSA-style spying program on its citizens.
Restore the Fourth protesters were out yesterday to commemorate Independence Day by protesting NSA surveillance.
Snowden released a statement through WikiLeaks.
Here are the statuses of the 21 applications for asylum filed by Snowden. (20 really, because he withdrew his application to Russia because of their demands.)
Snowden’s job title/description explains his level of access and also some of the workings of the NSA.
Lots of lies and misinformation coming out of the federal government regarding NSA surveillance.
ProPublica has a handy FAQ on the NSA spying.
A FISA court has released the court records of Yahoo!’s failed, secret 2008 attempt to block data demands by challenging the Protect America Act, a FISA amendment.
Encryption has begun foiling US wiretaps.
More smart stuff on the journalists vs. advocates/activists debate from David Carr with an interview with Glenn Greenwald.
The State Dept’s Historical Advisory Committee has expressed concern over the declassification backlog and the delays in putting documents on historical record. 
Lawyers for four detainees at Guantánamo have asked a federal court to put a stop to force-feedings. Meanwhile, it has been announced that hunger striking inmates will only be force-fed at night during Ramadan. That’s 106 out of the 166 detainees.
A report on the suicide last year of a Yemeni detainee in Guantánamo has been made public.
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Photo: A’ali village, Bahrain. Demonstrators take part in an anti-government rally last Thursday. Ahmed Al-Fardan/Nur Photo/Zuma Press.

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: A’ali village, Bahrain. Demonstrators take part in an anti-government rally last Thursday. Ahmed Al-Fardan/Nur Photo/Zuma Press.

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    And they ask me why I oppose our military’s actions.
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